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at the domestic cuts. educational programs including special education will be cut by $2.3 billion medicare payments to hospitals cut by $5.6 billion. prescription drug benefits lose $591 million. on the defense side, across the board 9.4% cut regardless of the program's merit. defense department operations and maintenance loses $3.9 billion in 2013. air force and navy aircraft purchases get cut by more than $4.2 billion. that is why some are calling cutting with a machete instead of a scalp pull. shep? >> shepard: stocks closed higher after a choppy day of trading. dow industrial average eked out 4 point gain over uncertainty about fiscal cliff thing. weakest spending report since may. a lot of storm out of that. according to the commerce department, spending dropped .2% last month. that's down a point or i sudden say 8% jump in september. analysts blame the super storm as i mentioned. its aftermath could cut economic growth for the rest of the year. syria is more isolated than ever tonight with the internet and phone lines down across the nation for the second straight day. government and
the national education system. this is the only way you can invest in syrians. this is why syria has to have a long-term plan to recover. syria needs at least $60 billion to recover. with all the destruction that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen next, that is an issue that the new syrian position should address. >> the rights of the minorities is an important issue. sometimes we emphasize the issues from their own perspective. when the syrian uprising started, christians, alliance, and christians being killed by participating. he decided to go back to his hometown. he is from damascus, but he is playing a role by training journalist to do the video to
achievements, i have to tell you that what really moves my heart is what you have done for education, for kids in new york city and around the world, the 30 countries you've been to, the school programs you have initiated especially as we do less and less music education in our schools. i want to thank you for that. >> thank you very much. it's a blessing. >> talk to me about this anniversary and the importance of a quarter century of jazz at music center at lincoln center. >> i think we've had the opportunity to work as a community and meet with people all over the world, really, for the purposes of using jazz and the arts to uplift people and bring them together. and the education programs have been so well received. we have about 12 of them that cover kids of all ages from our little infants to jazz in the schools, we're going to be in -- we'll do 120 performances in the new york city public schools alone and we have essentially ellington, a high school jazz band festival and jazz competition we've been doing for 18 years and it's really been a blessing for parents and kids, so pane of our
that the states get for that deregulation will go to education, health, and helping people with drug or a call problems. -- or alcohol problems. >> still to come, the duchess of cambridge is released from hospital, but now the couple has some serious decisions to make. the government of the philippines made an emotional appeal to four more to be done about climate change they after a deadly typhoon swept through the country this week, killing at least 300. from manila, here's the latest. >> a life -- alive against all the odds. carlos was inside his house when it was buried beneath a torrent of mud and water. >> we were hearing like the wind that night. we did not know where to run. the wind and rain brought by the typhoon were so strong i thought we would not survive. >> but for every purse and pulled from the rubble, there are many others still missing. all their relatives can do is can the list of names and wait. >> what else can i think of about what happened to my husband? i hope to see him alive, but if not, i just want to see him again. >> those who survive have lost everything. depende
. >> it is local control. >> thinking outside the box. don't we tell educator these have to be creative? >> this was creative, and the fact they had a choice is important. >> and they chose to hold hands. anthony, what do you think? they should have held hands -- if you look, they have their heads down. they are acting shameful and everybody is laughing. but why didn't they hold their hands up in a triumphant fist pump like in the olympics? >> you are right. >> own it. own that feeling. >> when i was in high school, i got caught smoking once. the gym teacher punched me like i slept with his wife. i mean, like a man he punched me. that was punishment back in what i call "the day." >> the way it should be. >> in high school i had a smoking area where kids could go out and smoke. joy what kind of hippie school did you go to? >> in massachusetts we had a smoking area. you weren't allowed? >> there was probably a drinking area too. >> it was only for cigarettes, but it was definitely where what they called the darrell lict -- derrilict kids would go. in grammar school we had a bench and if y
wanted to be with his son but he also wanted to expose him to a european education and to the world of international affairs, and they went to stay with benjamin franklin, and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside of paris at the time coming and john quincy, john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. and within several months he was speaking french fluently. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15, he could speak four languages fluently. he'd already studied classical, latin and greek, he could write latin and greek. he was gifted in foreign languages that when a family friend was appointed ambassador minister to russia come first minister to russia and he couldn't speak french at the time french was not only the language of international diplomacy, it was also the language spoken in the russian court, they spoke french to each other. john quincy could and he asked john adams can you take john quincy adams with you to st. petersburg as the secretary at 16 years of age, and john quincy adams goes up with francis to st. petersburg and spend
in the "washington post" on the same subject. secondly, in the area of education i wouldn't be here today without good education and opportunity created by the national defense education act. i want to give belated thanks to the soviets for launching sputnik and scaring the hell out of the u.s. economist because as result of it they created a loan program that got me into college law school. we can't give up on that. this kid from east st. louis illinois and for many others, these loans make a big difference whether it's pell grants or loans, but let's look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid to education goes to for-profit schools. they have 12% of the students, 25% of the federal aid to education, and more than double the student loan default rate of any other class higher education. there are ways to cut back in spending in education particularly as is wasted on some of the schools that will give us opportunities for resources for real education. which can be part of our future. now let me come to the most painful topic of all, entitlements. social security was included in the simpson-bow
are doing that with education, by the way, any profit sector in education, is a competitor to what the government does. is there any truth to that, do you think? >> i mean the decision to give a charitable gift is driven by helping the community directly. when it goes through government, i mean we see every day the inefficiency of that, that the charity's mission starts to drift towards what the government wants rather than what the community wants, rather than the mission of the organization. david: private charity is more efficient? stuart: more basic point, when the government does so called charitable work, it is essentially distributing money, it is buying votes. liz: that's right. stuart: when a private charity does good, there's no vote buying. it is an efficient delivery of service. am i crazy? >> added to that is that many of these charities do rely upon local state and federal money for some of their programs. they are already getting a major cut in all of that to begin with. then you add to that this? liz: yeah. it's upside down and backwards the way the white house and
worse. there's no change with education, with infrastructure or health care. corruption, poverty and hunger haven't decreased. >> lehrer: head of the u.n.'s large haiti mission here acknowledges the slow pace but says there has been some progress on the massive rebuilding task, a much smaller number of tent dwellings since last year, for example. >> if haiti were a glass and it's gone from being 10% full to 15% full, let's recognize that without in anyway diminishing the fact that you've still got 85% of the glass full. >> reporter: but fisher says many of the problems were endemic to haiti long before the earthquake. >> what we've seen is people who are in camps because of entrenched poverty. many of these people were hidden before in slums. they're now in the open in camp. that is a function of underdevelopment? it's a function of weak governance. it's a function of lack of alternative. >> reporter: he says one of the biggest problems is that haiti's government crippled by the quake in a corrupt reputation hasn't been able to lay out national priorities for the rebuilding. that
owned by the career education corporation, one of the major league for-profit colleges. his parents didn't have the means to pay for his education but helped him out by cosigning the loans. now the student and the parents have $103,000 in student loan debt. one of the loans has a 13% interest rate, and the balance continues to rise. this young man, young man would like to finish his degree but he can't afford to. he can't borrow any more money. he is too deeply in debt. how about that for a dilemma? $103,000 in debt, no degree. he can't borrow the money to get a degree. many of these students find out these for-profit courses they took are worthless. they don't transfer anywhere. the diplomacy themselves turn out to be worthless and many employers just laugh at them. you would never know that from the advertising these for-profit schools engage in. i had a group of students in my office this morning. they were from archbishop carroll high school, not too far from the capitol here. they are students who know a little bit about being wooed and enticed by colleges, universities. we talked a
or get student loans and put themselves through school. what would your advice be. >> education is a path to personal success. there are many avenues to get there, certificate programs, classes that colleges offer. classes that companies offer to allow people to pursue their education in the short term. as they become more stable in their jobs they might be able to afford investing in higher education. jenna: you tkpw-pbt ge didn't get your college degree, you were able to get your master's degree in business. you said that's been helpful in the position you're in right now. >> absolutely. i did go to college and enjoyed it but had to drop out to travel all over the world and open restaurants. moved up in my company but realize they'd getting a formal education and cementing what i had learned in the real world on the academic side would really help me be a better leader for global business. jenna: it struck me as i was reading your story, you're a daughter of a single mom, you decided you had to go to work for your family. your path is only something that happens in our country where you
to education, health, and helping people with drug or a call problems. -- or alcohol problems. >> still to come, the duchess of cambridge is released from hospital, but now the couple has some serious decisions to make. the government of the philippines made an emotional appeal to four more to be done about climate change they after a deadly typhoon swept through the country this week, killing at least 300. from manila, here's the latest. >> a life -- alive against all the odds. carlos was inside his house when it was buried beneath a torrent of mud and water. >> we were hearing like the wind that night. we did not know where to run. the wind and rain brought by the typhoon were so strong i thought we would not survive. >> but for every purse and pulled from the rubble, there are many others still missing. all their relatives can do is can the list of names and wait. >> what else can i think of about what happened to my husband? i hope to see him alive, but if not, i just want to see him again. >> those who survive have lost everything. dependent on the government and aid agencies for basic sup
that work. but ultimately it is about providing greater opportunity, greater education, greater economics, the jobs and growth to a population so that they can have a real stake in their society and can be partners with their government. i assume part of your question is aimed at the whole legalization issue. i think this is an ongoing debate. we are formulating our own response to the votes of two of our states, as you know, and what that means for the federal system, the federal laws and law enforcement. i respect those in the region who believe strongly that that would end the problem. i am not convinced of that, just speaking personally. i think, when you have a ruthless and vicious people who have made money one way and are somehow blocked, they will figure out another way. they will do kidnapping. they will do extortion. there will suborn officials and takeover swaths of territory that they will govern and terrorize people in. so i don't think that is the answer. whether there is some movement that can be discussed, i think it will have to be a topic for the future for us. >> thank
, fundamental rights of parents to direct the education and the upbringing of their child with h special needs. this could result in forcibly transferring a disabled child from the home to government-run schools if these unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats deem it necessary, even if the senate puts reservations into this treaty." i ask that this letter -- i have two letters i'd ask that would be made a part of the record at this point. that is one of the other once coming from the concerned women of america. i ask that they be made a part of the record at this point in the journal. ferraro ithe presiding officer:s there objection? without objection. mr. inhofe: i have been an advocate of human rights around the world, ensuring that the world is accessible to those with disabilities. however, i do not support the cumbersome regulations and potentially overzealous international organizations with anti-american biases that inch - that infringe upon american society. you know, if we had not passed what i consider to be the gold standard of the disabled world when we passed -- and i do remember at
of across the board tax increases for everyone, coupled with cuts in spending like defense, education, health care, and housing assistance. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin with the very latest. jessica? >> reporter: president obama has now personally turned down speaker boehner's opening offer to avert the fiscal cliff. he did it in a tv interview. what does president obama think of speaker boehner's proposal to avert the fiscal cliff? >> unfortunately, the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about $800 billion worth of revenues but says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> reporter: he won't agree to eliminate a tax deduction for contributions to charity. >> every hospital and university and nonfor profit agency across the country would find themselves on the verge of collapse. so that's not a realistic option. >> reporter: but the president didn't say all this to speaker boehner. he said it in an interview on bloomberg tv. the last time the two men spoke was almost a wee
poverty. highlighting things like education are a path laid to burning the right to be heard. because a lot of communities are saying we just don't believe that you care about us. i think that having folks who communicate well is a ticket to making that hard battle happen. greg: i read his books and offense. your latest one, you revert to the republican party as hard wing conservatives. that they are being pushed into political relevance. >> yes, for example, the fight over the fiscal cliff is taking place between speaker boehner and the white house. they put republicans in the senate in a rare type of position where they are in the game, but they are not the leaders of the game. see what is going on in the senate in general. we're republicans should have the majority of the senate, if not highly ontological candidates were nominated by the party base. thinking of someone like richard murdoch in indiana. there's no reason the democrats should not hold that seat. they are putting republicans in the senate at a disadvantage. >> the other thing is that ted cruz is a tea party candidate,
to add to the cost of that, which was a big factor. >> reporter: some educators point out that the immersive experience of attending a college can hardly be replicated by logging onto a laptop and that contact with professors is hugely limited online. but even critics admit this trend could open up education to hundreds of millions of people. >> i have already taught more students than i ever could have hoped to teach in my entire career. >> reporter: and there is still a lot to learn. tom foreman, cnn, baltimore. >> this past week a walmart survey found 78% of parents will buy the same amount of toys for their kids regardless if they were naughty or nice. so are these parents saying some of us are just born naughty? that it's human nature? human behavioral expert wendy walsh is with me now. so, wendy, arer that police officer who gave a homeless guy shoes in new york city this week? this was a time -- >> i love that story. >> i love this story. it's a top story around the country, newspapers, websites, tv, everybody is talking about it. now ultimately it's just a guy givi
, because i think both of them -- paul ryan is talking about poverty. marco rubio is talking about education so not two typical what we would traditional republican issues, taxes and those sorts of things. this is an attempt by both men, i think, and a chance for both men to expand on what it means to be a member of the republican party and to try to broaden an appeal we saw in the 2012 election is just not broad enough particularly among hispanics. they are problems with women and young people. rubio is 41 and ryan is 42 years old who are leading a youth movement that the party hopes will change that appeal, correct their demographic problems and it starts even though the election is a month old, it starts today. >> i would put bobby jindal in that group as well. >> absolutely. >> we have chris christie here today testifying in congress about aid for victims of superstorm sandy. clearly, he's got an interest in 2016, and then there's jeb bush. aa number of the people you just mentioned have very interesting ideas about immigration and about expanding the universe of the party. not all of th
on drugs, they say look, we spend more on drug education and treatment than they do on law enforcement. what could they do better? >> what they could do better is simply stop locking people up. if you are sent to prison, you end up in far worse state than if you were actually sent to a drug rehabilitation center and helped. >> you're known as such a free spirit, right? do you smoke marijuana? >> i'm a '60s lad. i tried a split or two when i was a teenager. i decided that drink was my drug of choice, and so i prefer white wine or beer to marijuana, but you know, whether children of mine do, we'll, that's another story. >> i'm sure, right, they're in the age where i suppose it can be. all right, well, thank you very much. really appreciate your time. >> cheers, thank you. >> pretty interesting and serious topic, although he did say afterwards that he would want to try pot brownies. breaking the taboo will be able on youtube this evening and his opinion is on cnn.com/opinion right now and it is amazing. some of the statistics are unforgettable. >>> up next, mohammed morsi addresses suppor
.s. not necessarily people, but the education, the ability to produce them. >> that is sad, how do we get it back? >> well, it is a concerted effort to get it back, this project i talked about where we do a mac next year, i think this is a really good other step for us. and the consumer electronics world was really never here. so it is not a matter of bringing it back, it is a matter of starting it here. >> while the announcement of a made in usa line of macs is welcome news, the new samsung ad campaign is not good news for apple. it is bold and damaging. >> hey, thanks. >> you guys have fun. >> home by midnight. >> the next big thing is already here, samsung galaxy x 3. >> the unmistakable message there, apple products are for your presidents, samsung makes the really cool stuff. >> they came along and tried to paint the those with white ear bugs apple users as losers. they're trying to paint their product as cool and yours as not cool. is this war? >> well, we love our customers and we'll fight to defend them with anyone. is it thermonuclear war? the fact is we love competition at apple. we wan
into education, into science, into infrastructure as well and he'll be talking about the infrastructure initiatives including more must be for small to medium size businesses, more money for power stations as well. but it really looks like he's got very little room for maneuver. the opposition, he'll get that and say this is your fault, these are your policies. mr. osbourne will turn around and say look what's turning around you. look what's going on in the financial sector. look what's going on in the eurozone as well where unemployment is actually on the surface much worse than it is in the united kingdom. so it's going to be the usual ding dong battle of theatre. but i doubt we'll see many new initiatives that haven't been leaked already, ross. >> yeah, you only have to read the papers today and everything seems to be in there. i think you've done a very good two and a half-minute analysis of everything we might get. well-done. we'll come back to you later. get a cup of coffee, stay warm. julian joins us with his own thoughts. steve got into all the details. he's laid it all out for
at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. let's say you want to get ahead how do you get from here... to here? at university of phoenix we're moving career planning forward so you can start figuring that out sooner. ln fact, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. >>> let's return to syria now. months of civil war taking a terrible toll on families. especially those living along the frontlines. people who don't have enough money to get away. in a piece you'll only see on cnn, our arwa damon caught up with families who have just returned to the hard-hit city of aleppo. >> reporter: they are home again, but they are cold and broke and still in danger. about one-third of the families who fled the neighborhood of aleppo have come back only to find out that these streets are now on the frontlines. if the regime can retake, it can cut off the main artery for
, seriously. parents stampeding all in the name of education here. they raced to sign their children up at an engineering school in the carolinas the only one with an engineering curriculum. a mother went to the hospital after the stampede. parents camped out to keep the spots. they didn't run they were already outside. >> camping out can you imagine? >> crazy. >> wow. >>> 6:53 right now. a big surprise for san jose police how a burglary call turned into a major pot bust. ,, well, well, well. growing up, we didn't have u-verse. we couldn't record four shows at the same time. in my day, you were lucky if you could record two shows. and if mom was recording her dumb show and dad was recording his dumb show then, by george, that's all we watched. and we liked it! today's kids got it so good. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv with a total home dvr included free for life. only $29 a month for six months. rethink possible. only $29 a month for six months. [ traffic passing ] ] ♪ [ music box: lullaby ] [ man on tv, indistinct ] ♪ [ lullaby continues ] [ baby coos ] [ man announ
: and for education. >>neil: it is a tough city to do business. he has turned heads, they have an art work center going in newark. wait, wait, wait, wait, i am saying here, how should republicans in general respond to this, that entitlements of any sort are bad or only the most needy which would be more practical and deserve the food stamps, and certainly have for reason why 47 million americans should be on food stamps. >>guest: you are right. this is what we should say, food stamps like a lot of government programs are for the most needy and they will not be around if we enlarge the pie. >>neil: that is a solid agreement. >>guest: i look at the black mayor, he is a vibrant young black man and it sends a mixed message to young black men to say i am on food stamps why don't you try it. >>neil: i understand. we want to feel the love. ing -- thank you, thank you. >>neil: incredible the images of violence in syria. what is the united nations thinking about doing? internet regulations is what their conference is about in dubai. but my guest is worried that the u.n. is focusing on this when this is go
and build an education center there. 46 people flying on september 11th from newark, newark, to san francisco were killed when flight 93 crashed in that field. the families say they're hoping for a boost from private donors including fortune 500 companies. >> i feel nothing but peace when i'm at the site, when i'm stand oughted sacred ground. >> 450,000 people have already visited the memorial. >>> has our obsession with cell phones risen to the level of an addiction? some researchers say yes. they say factors such as materialism and impulsiveness play a big role in tipping cell phone use into an addiction especially when phones are used excessively in public. that's when we're signaling that we have a shiny object, status symbol. young adults check their phones an average of 60 times a day. >>> new details about the kansas city chiefs player who killed his girlfriend and then committed suicide. among other things, police are now saying that he may have had another girlfriend. jovan belcher shot the mother of his daughter at their home early in the morning and today we learned that
no leadership capable of making a deal. you cannot start with the education of little kids, teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for, and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. there are a lot of conditions for this to work. it cannot happen overnight. as i said, part of the problem is that have created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> express some realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. we'll be back essentially to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that? it is semi-democratic. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as to apply them, there will be certain -- circumstances were some send potential compromise is required, the new approach of these problems that way. if you have very good intelligence, you understand better what is going on within t
in education, et cetera. i'm joined by gloria borger now. >> how about that et cetera? >> you like the et cetera. they got two very different proposals on the table right now. >> they're speaking past each other. they seem to be really living in different universes or one on mars, one on venus, whatever you want to call it. look, it's very clear. one of the republicans want more entitlement cuts up front. and the democrats want these tax increases on the wealthy up front. the irony here to me watching this is in the long term, the second part of this, everybody seems to know what needs to be done. they know you've got to fix entitlement spending. they know you've got to reform the tax code to make it simpler and to make it fairer. the big problem they've got is how you get from here to there. and right now, in order to get over this hump, they sort of are in the position of putting everything out there on the table and so we now know what the base of each party wants and would applaud. and now they've got to go behind closed doors and figure how they get past january and how they avoid th
say the american taxpayer helps subsidize their education because many of them receive world-class training at our public and private colleges and universities, and then reluctantly return home to pursue their careers because they can't get a visa or can't get a green card here in america. we are cultivating human capital and then sending those individuals back home. now, this is an area where there is broad, broad support. my colleague, senator moran, recently wrote a letter, had a "dear colleague" letter which points out that roughly -- well, he cites in the letter that more than three-quarters of voters support a stem-type visa. he quotes in this letter, dated july 20, 2012, "87% of democrats polled, 72% of republicans polled and 65% of independents support the creation of a stem visa." and, of course, if you think about it, it's just common sense. why in the world would we want to subsidize the education of these students from other countries, train them in these highly specialized and highly desirable fields and then simply send them home? i've introduced legislation ove
more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. you know, one job or the other. the moment i could access the retirement plan, i just became firm about it -- you know, it's like it just hits you fast. you know, you start thinking about what's really important here. ♪ >>> victory for palestinians. the u.n. general assembly voted in favor of palestinian state hood. we want to show you the wild celebrations going on right now. this is the west bank. after the u.n. overwhelmingly gave the palestinians something they have wanted for years and the vote was pretty overwhelming. 138 countries in favor. it was a shellacking for those against it. the resolution passed against the will of the united states, israel, canada and six other nations. here's u.n. ambassador susan rice after the vote. >> today's unfortunate and counterproductive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. that is why the united states voted against it. >> now, the vote gives the palestinians a higher profile at the u.n. and more importan
... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. yep. the longer you stay with us, the more you save. and when you switch from another company to us, we even reward you for the time you spent there. genius. yeah, genius. you guys must have your own loyalty program, right? well, we have something. show her, tom. huh? you should see november! oh, yeah? giving you more. now that's progressive. call or click today. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] to learn more about the cold truth and save $1 visit al
investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. >>> and finally tonight my observation on where america stands in the world. there were two very telling comments. first the craziness continues in france. a steel company which operates in france is planning to close down a plant. so a french cabinet member said the company should leave france or face nationalization. and then he said this. >> barack obama's nationalized. the germans are nationalizing. all countries are nationalizing. i have also noticed the british nationalized six banks. it's true. i don't see what the problem is. >> really no problem. so those stunning comments coming after he met with the unions in
the availability of the resources to solve that problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars to help us getting this word out to america. i think that is essential, because it's coming on very, very fast. there are things that are happening we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines and sailors and soldiers and their equipment overseas without any burden to our economy. not true. the truth of the matter is it's a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national security policy that defends the country that we love so much. so i think without having the ability and the willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this, and you're there to help us in giving the americans the answers to some of the very difficult and very cogent questions which they ask. i want to take this opportunity to thank robby for what he does . i met robby some years ago when he found my bottom office in an office building and came in, and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he's t
in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> back in 2009 and 2010, republican protests against president obama's supposedly socialist kenyan secret muslim agenda were touted as grass roots events. most of them r were not grass roots events. most of them were organized by groups by freedom works, which grew out of a conservative advocacy organization that was founded and funded by the billionaire koch brothers. the front man was a congressman from texas. he was the house majority leader for the republican party, which is not a grass rootsy thing. but none of this is. today david korn had a scoop about the fake grass roots part of republican party politics. "mother jones" published an e-mail in which dick army quit. he then told "mother jones", the top management team of freedom works was taking a direction i thought was unproductive and thought it was time to move on with my life. don't know exactly why dick army and freedom works broke up, but there's discord at the conservative level. actually there's a lot going on. more on that a
people, but the education to stop producing them. >> that's sad. how do we get that back? >> well, it's a concerted effort to get them back. and with this project i've talked about where we will do a mac in the united states next year, i think this is -- this is a really good step for us. and the consumer electronics world was really never here. it's not a matter of bringing it back, it's a matter of starting it here. >> good morning, thanks for joining us here. >> while steve jobs liked to avoid the spotlight, he also thrived on it. as if he was selling products that were pieces of his own soul. he was inventor, pitch man, and new wave pied piper all in one. tim cook is just a different guy. while he believes in the almighty product just as much. >> how are you not steve jobs? >> in many ways, one of the things he did for me that removed a gigantic burden that would've normally existed is he told me on a couple of occasions before he passed away to never question what he would've done. never ask the question what he would do, to just do what's right. >> brian williams' conversation w
, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >> shepard: that one time on the run software mogul john mcafee was reportedly going back to belize to face questions about the death of one of his neighbors. he is in the hospital after reportedly suffering convulsions or heart attacks or chest pains depending on whom you are listening to while he was in custody. in any case, it is a strange and new turn in what is already an extraordinary saga. john mcafee is the millionaire many times over founder of the antivirus company that bears his name, mcafee. and his troubles really started last month back in belize. you see a neighbor complained about mcafee's dogs. then somebody poisoned those dogs. and then somebody killed the complaining neighbor. see how that works? didn't look good for mcafee. >> it was a cob convenient thing. the next door neighbor got killed. now we can do something, we can blame him. >> shepard: police in b
they're prepared for the job. education secretary arne duncan supports the proposal. >>> and the mayor of newark, new jersey, is living on a monetary equivalent of food stamps for a week starting today. cory booker taking the challenge after an exchange with a north carolina woman who follows him on twitter. that woman began the same challenge back on sunday. booker, himself, he is a vegetarian, and he prepared for the challenge of going shopping for deals on fruits and vegetables. >> going to be tough to do. $4 a day. fruits and veggies. >> the average monthly food stamp benefit was $136 per person in new jersey last year. that's about $31 a week according to federal officials. people go out and easily spend $30 on lunch. we're talking about 31 bucks to get through the entire week on food. hopefully the challenge will open people's eyes to, you know, what the less fortunate in the country have to live on. $31 a week for food. not a lot. >> and there's a lot more people on food stamps than have been in the last couple generations or so. >> tough times. we always see that. and we'll see
. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> oh, my god. oh, my god. seriously? >> look at these pictures with me. moms, dads, making a mad dash to enroll their children in this school district's only public elementary school with an engineering program. that's why they're doing this. the stampede erupted at a.j. whittenburg elementary in south carolina. applications are first come, first served. some parents even camped out to be the first in that line. but school administrators say they are rethinking that system. one woman was injured in this enrollment frenzy. she did secure her child a spot in the school. look at that. >>> the video shows you just how far some parents will go to get their child enrolled in the very best school possible. the pressure oftentimes is much greater and much more nerve wracking at some of the nation's top private schools particularly for minority students. a private school in new york discovered that gaining admittance i
to education. we've got to work hard every day to make certain that it's good quality and that it's affordable. i think it is fair for us to compare ourselves to other nations. we are talking primarily about the western industrialized nations where their delivery systems are much less expensive to deliver care and whereby the measures of things like infant mortality, obesity, other factors, they have better outcomes than we do. whatever it is you are delivering as a service, education or health care, we should always try to examine are we doing it the right way and can we do it better. even if we say we don't want universal health care, if somebody gets sick, most of the time they end up in the hospital and they will get care. the cost of that care has simply shifted onto everyone else who is paying insurance. if you have health care at work, $1,100 of your premium goes to paying for uncompensated care, for people that short at the emergency room without coverage. host: on twitter -- guest: she's right in a way, because it's not a cliff. this is the design of speaker boehner and other republic
you an opportunity you can do. in matter your age education or experience, you can literally earn money on your own laptop from your own kitchen table 24/67. it is at least worth checking out. if you're sick of living paycheck to paycheck, worried about job security or retirement if your goal is to.earn extra money part-time or full time, they're adding my listeners in record numbers and giving away $1,000 to somebody just for checking them out. that could be you. lucky person. visit incomeathome.com. that's incomeathome.com. calls waiting. peter, the social media. >> on another topic bill, lots of people are asking us to comment on a big story that -- >> bill: uh-oh. >> today is the day -- >> bill: kate middleton left the hospital. >> we haven't gotten anything about that. >> bill: she did though. morning sickness -- severe morning sickness has subsided. >> it's over. she's feeling better. in washington state at midnight when the clock struck midnight, pot became legal. depending on who you ask. but
achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength of a leader in retirement planning. the heart of 10,000 advisors working with you one-to-one. together for your future. ♪ together for your future. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? without freshly-made pasta. you could also cut corners by making it without 100% real ched
constituents or colleagues, he striving strio educate with facts, weaved, andh facts, with evidence, and with the truth. none of us has ever heard jon try to win an argument by belittling or berating an opponent. it is simply not in his characteristic to do so. mr. president, it has been said that a politician thinks of the next election a statesman of the next generation. this statesman of arizona expresses his philosophy of government and the obligation of government leaders this way: quote "we owe future generations the chance to live their dreams, to be successful, and, most important, to achieve true happiness by their own efforts." end quote. senator jon kyl's commitment to the security of our nation, to fiscal responsibility, and to helping those in need have earned him a reputation that is worthy of his characteristic. the people of arizona and america are grateful for his service, and i am thankful for his guidance over the years and for his friendship. we wish him all the best to come in the years before him. mr. president, there is one more tribute that i'd like to give t
level. there are models, social policy, education, welfare that have had some success out in the country that reflects conservative ideas. match that with the researchers in washington that to the policy work for heritage. connell: i think a lot of people will hear or read about this today and think about the conversation we have been having about the future of the republican party. does the tea party still have, you know, lindsey graham just put a statement out saying he is very disappointed that demint is leaving. the conservative movement lost a strong voice. he will do a great job at heritage. is this part of that story? >> i think senator demint believes that the republican message going into the election was a strong one. it just simply was not well articulated. i agree with senator demint. i do not believe that the republican party has to transform its position and become more moderate. take an idea like economic growth. the difference between 2% growth and 3.5% is a different like night and day. senator demint told me he started his career as a market researcher and advertising.
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